Renovating old farmhouse a labor of love for Gloucester woman

by Quinton Sheppard - Posted on Sep 18, 2019 - 12:54 PM

Photo: Tiffany Lindsay Weaver, in a stance reminiscent of the painting “American Gothic,” is shown in front of an 1850s-era farmhouse she recently purchased and is in the process of renovating. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

Tiffany Lindsay Weaver, in a stance reminiscent of the painting “American Gothic,” is shown in front of an 1850s-era farmhouse she recently purchased and is in the process of renovating. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

Photo: This area is part of the master bedroom and is full of light and one of Weaver’s favorite spots in the house.  Photo by Quinton Sheppard

This area is part of the master bedroom and is full of light and one of Weaver’s favorite spots in the house. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

Photo: The living area of the home greets guests as they step through the front door. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

The living area of the home greets guests as they step through the front door. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

Photo: The guest bathroom upstairs is nearly complete. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

The guest bathroom upstairs is nearly complete. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

It didn’t take long for Gloucester native Tiffany Lindsay Weaver to fall in love with the charm and character of an old farmhouse located just off Ware Neck Road near Flat Iron.

Though the house was in fair shape after its previous owner passed away, Weaver has taken it upon herself to renovate the home, and has done much of the designing and labor on her own.

“I walked in the door and fell in love,” Weaver said. “I called my husband and said, ‘Shane, you’re going to think I am crazy, but we’ve got to figure out a way to buy this house.’”

She said the previous owner of the home did a lot of renovations on the home before she died, and Weaver felt like she shared that woman’s same vision for finishing the work.

The first two major things Weaver did was to paint the roof red. “Every old farmhouse has to have a red roof,” she said. She also had the HVAC system replaced.

She said the original house was built around 1850 and had 20 acres of land with it. Five acres remain with the home, as the other 15 acres had been sold. She said the home was likely used by those farming the land, so it was not fitted with any fancy trim “or fancy anything,” she said.

Weaver said the home definitely has its quirks. “There are sloping floors and there are some electrical issues. It gets interesting at times making things fit and work,” she said.

In the master bathroom, Weaver plans to replace the handicapped-accessible bathtub and shower with a claw-foot tub and his-and-her sinks.

So far, the majority of Weaver’s work has been caulking and painting. She did have help from a contractor in pressure washing and painting the exterior portions of the home.

She plans to paint the shutters dark blue. Meanwhile, the front door will don a turquoise color to offset the shutters. The original clapboard siding has been covered with more worry-free, low-maintenance vinyl siding. “We need to protect it,” Weaver said. “I want it to last another 160 years.”

There are several outbuildings, a cottonwood tree, grapevines and fruit trees throughout the property that contribute to its uniqueness and country charm. 

Weaver, a licensed real estate agent, currently lives in Virginia Beach and is excited about having a home back in her hometown. “I’m a Gloucester girl,” she said. “I love to be back here.”

She also looks forward to giving her young children a taste of the country life that she had growing up, away from the video screens and experience nature instead.