School briefs

- Posted on Feb 02, 2011 - 04:39 PM

Ashley Ann Gayle has been named to the fall semester dean’s list at Christopher Newport University where she is a sophomore majoring in psychology. The recognition requires a 3.5 or higher grade point average. Gayle is the daughter of Steve and Shannon Gayle of Mathews.

Chelsea Corrine Jackson of Gloucester, has been named to the fall semester dean’s list at Shenandoah University where she is majoring in faith-Christian leadership. The recognition requires a 3.25 or higher grade point average.

Ashley N. Sales has been named to the fall semester dean’s list at Virginia Wesleyan College where she is a senior majoring in elementary education with a minor in history. The recognition requires a 3.5 or higher grade point average. Sales is the daughter of Steve and Susan Sales and the granddaughter of Nellie Powell, all of Hayes.

Kimberly Haas has been named to the spring semester dean’s list at Old Dominion University where she is majoring in speech pathology/audiology. The recognition requires a 3.4 or higher grade point average. Haas is the daughter of Larry and Michelle Haas of James Store.

The following students were named to the fall semester dean’s list at Radford University: Ryan J. Marzetta and Morgan Ann Woodlief of Hayes; Jessica Leigh Cox of Mathews; and George Everett Bains, Amber Michelle Lee, Tara Alexandra Peaks, Kaitlyn Leigh Reynolds, Helen Page Roundy, Randi Nicole Shaw, Matthew Eli Varnell and Alaina Leigh Walker, all of Gloucester. The recognition requires a 3.4 or higher grade point average.

Brett David Evans of Hayes, received a master of science degree in geological engineering and a graduate certificate in military geological engineering from the Missouri University of Science and Technology during commencement ceremonies Dec. 18.

Randy Applegate, a technical education instructor at Gloucester High School, participated in a research experience for teachers on nanotechnology last summer. The program was hosted by the Center for Diversity in Engineering at the University of Virginia and funded by the National Science Foundation. Applegate spent five weeks in university research and then helped develop lessons and classroom modules to be used in K-12 classrooms across Virginia. Applegate shared his experience with the Virginia Association of Science Teachers during the organization’s November conference in Hampton and with the Gloucester County School Board. He is also preparing an article for the spring issue of the Virginia Journal of Science Education and will discuss his experience during the workshop, "Teaching Nanotechnology within the Virginia SOLs" to be held Feb. 11 and 12 at UVA’s School of Engineering.