Tribute run has coincidental stop in Gloucester

by Kim Robins - Posted on May 15, 2013 - 03:07 PM

Photo: The Virginia Run for the Fallen passed through Gloucester on May 2, traveling up Route 17 during its journey from Fort Story to Arlington. The run made a stop in Glenns at the home of Bill and Janice Whorton, below, where markers and a display, above, honored Mrs. Whorton’s son, U.S. Marine Capt. Jamie Edge, along with Lt. Col. James Walton, who both died in the war on terror.

The Virginia Run for the Fallen passed through Gloucester on May 2, traveling up Route 17 during its journey from Fort Story to Arlington. The run made a stop in Glenns at the home of Bill and Janice Whorton, below, where markers and a display, above, honored Mrs. Whorton’s son, U.S. Marine Capt. Jamie Edge, along with Lt. Col. James Walton, who both died in the war on terror.

Photo:
The son of a local woman was honored when the Virginia Run for the Fallen passed through Gloucester on May 2. In a scenario set by coincidence, the entourage was able to deliver its tribute to U.S. Marine Capt. Jamie Edge, who died in Iraq in 2005, at the home of the fallen soldier’s mother.

When Janice and Bill Whorton saw a man in front of their Glenns home earlier this spring, they thought he was a potential customer for one of Bill’s homemade rain barrels. He displays his rain catchers for sale in his yard, which fronts Route 17. Instead of finding a customer, the Whortons were reunited with George Lutz, whose son, Cpl. George Lutz II, was also killed in Iraq in 2005.

In 2008, Lutz began a campaign called Honor and Remember to promote a new national flag honoring those who died in military service to America. That year, Lutz had given the Whortons, who lived in Norfolk at the time, one of the first personalized Honor and Remember flags he distributed to families of the fallen as part of his campaign.

This year, Honor and Remember partnered with the Virginia Run for the Fallen to honor Virginia soldiers who died in the line of duty. The run traveled from Fort Story in Virginia Beach to Arlington National Cemetery over four days, with stops every mile remembering a fallen soldier with a flag and a biographical card.