Mathews estate named to Virginia Landmarks Register

Sherry Hamilton - Posted on Apr 10, 2013 - 02:27 PM

Photo: Springdale, owned by Ann and Art Miller of Mathews, pictured, has been named to the Virginia Landmarks Register and nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. The original portion of the house, directly behind the couple, was a gambrel-roofed, Georgian-style structure built in the 1700s, possibly as early as 1750, according to the nomination documents. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Springdale, owned by Ann and Art Miller of Mathews, pictured, has been named to the Virginia Landmarks Register and nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. The original portion of the house, directly behind the couple, was a gambrel-roofed, Georgian-style structure built in the 1700s, possibly as early as 1750, according to the nomination documents. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Springdale, an estate owned by Art and Ann Miller of Mathews, has been named to the Virginia Landmarks Register and nominated for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

A press release from the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, which is the authority charged with approving nominations to the Virginia Register, said that Springdale exemplifies "a unique evolution of architectural style in Mathews County (and) preserves two important stages of construction."

The original portion, built in the latter 18th century, is a simple but elegant Georgian-style two-story residence, said the release. Then, around the 1840s, a new owner expanded the house with a Federal-style wing that uses a central hyphen to connect the Georgian and Federal portions. The house also features "a locally distinctive lunette window," said the release.

Finally, the release said that, the home, located on an inlet of Put-In Creek, "preserves the central domestic portion of a historic plantation landscape that thrived from about 1774 into the 20th century in Mathews County."

Miller said she and her husband began the work on the nomination themselves, but found it difficult, especially tracking down any records. Mathews County records prior to the Civil War were shipped to Richmond for safe-keeping, where they were destroyed as fires ravaged the Confederate capital.

The Millers credited archaeologists Thane Harpole and Dave Brown with examining the property, researching Springdale’s history, and completing the successful nomination form.

Listing a property in the state or national register places no restrictions on what a property owner may do with his or her property, said the DHR press release.

Having a property listed on the register provides an owner the opportunity to pursue historic rehabilitation tax credit improvements to the building, said the release. Such tax credit projects must comply with the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.

Virginia is a national leader among states in listing historic sites and districts in the National Register of Historic Places, said the release. The state is also a national leader for the number of federal tax credit rehabilitation projects proposed and completed each year.