Board seeks to preserve working waterfront

by Quinton Sheppard - Posted on Mar 20, 2013 - 02:11 PM

Photo: The Gloucester County Board of Supervisors approved funds Tuesday night to begin a study on Aberdeen Creek that will identify existing zoning conflicts and existing waterfront uses, and develop recommendations to safeguard industry and recreation in and around the body of water, which is shown above. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

The Gloucester County Board of Supervisors approved funds Tuesday night to begin a study on Aberdeen Creek that will identify existing zoning conflicts and existing waterfront uses, and develop recommendations to safeguard industry and recreation in and around the body of water, which is shown above. Photo by Quinton Sheppard

The Gloucester County Board of Supervisors took a step Tuesday night toward preserving the working waterfront of Aberdeen Creek.

The governing body unanimously approved using $6,500 in matching funds during its meeting in the colonial courthouse to move forward with a study similar to the one that was conducted for Perrin Creek in the southern end of the county. The money will come from the county administrator’s contingency fund.

Like the Perrin Creek study, the Aberdeen Creek study would ultimately identify existing zoning conflicts and existing waterfront uses, and develop recommendations to safeguard industry and recreation in and around the body of water.

York district supervisor Carter Borden said after the Perrin Creek study was conducted, he immediately contacted Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission (MPPDC) executive director Lewie Lawrence for guidance on how to get a similar effort going for Aberdeen Creek. Lawrence was able to find a federal grant to get the study started, but the grant requires matching dollars from the county.

"Some of the same watermen came to me saying the mouth of (Aberdeen) Creek was filling in and they couldn’t get in and out with their workboats and have been having to work with the tide," Borden said.

"My reaction was to do something," he added, "but of course a study has to be done first."