Spared the worst

by Sherry Hamilton and Quinton Sheppard - Posted on Oct 31, 2012 - 02:22 PM

Photo: A deputy with the Gloucester County Sheriff’s Office tested the depth of the water at the end of Greate Road during high tide around 9:45 a.m. Monday before the worst of the storm hit. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

A deputy with the Gloucester County Sheriff’s Office tested the depth of the water at the end of Greate Road during high tide around 9:45 a.m. Monday before the worst of the storm hit. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Photo: The Seabreeze Restaurant on Gwynn’s Island, sandbagged against the high tides of Sandy, appeared to be riding out the storm with no obvious structural damage at high tide Monday. Photo by Elsa Cooke Verbyla.

The Seabreeze Restaurant on Gwynn’s Island, sandbagged against the high tides of Sandy, appeared to be riding out the storm with no obvious structural damage at high tide Monday. Photo by Elsa Cooke Verbyla.

Gloucester and Mathews residents are finally getting back to normal after catching a glancing blow from Hurricane Sandy, a massive storm that went on to cause coastal destruction throughout the northeastern U.S. and spawn blizzard conditions in West Virginia and elsewhere.

Winds here did not reach hurricane strength; however, rain and wind were prolonged and caused much disruption to daily activities and some damage.

Unlike the northeast, Sandy spared residents of the Middle Peninsula from the worst of her wrath; however, not everyone here was left unscathed.

In Gloucester

Hurricane Sandy for the most part left minor damage as the worst of the storm’s squalls crossed over Gloucester Monday afternoon and into the evening.

Virginia Cooperative Extension reported agricultural damage in Gloucester estimated at $750,000 as a result of the storm.