Mathews supervisor candidates address comprehensive planning

Sherry Hamilton - Posted on Oct 12, 2011 - 05:29 PM

Photo: Candidates for three open seats on the Mathews County Board of Supervisors took part in a pair of forums this past week. Here, during Monday night’s forum at the Mathews Memorial Library, challengers Patrick Beattie, Ruth Litschewski and Haskins Ramos and incumbents Janine Burns and Charles Ingram, from left, discuss the issues. A third incument, Edwina Casey, was not in attendance at Monday’s forum, which was sponsored by the Middle Peninsula League of Voters. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Candidates for three open seats on the Mathews County Board of Supervisors took part in a pair of forums this past week. Here, during Monday night’s forum at the Mathews Memorial Library, challengers Patrick Beattie, Ruth Litschewski and Haskins Ramos and incumbents Janine Burns and Charles Ingram, from left, discuss the issues. A third incument, Edwina Casey, was not in attendance at Monday’s forum, which was sponsored by the Middle Peninsula League of Voters. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Two recent forums in Mathews County gave voters a chance to hear the views of candidates running for the board of supervisors—one last Thursday before the Gwynn’s Island Civic League, and a second on Monday night at a gathering at Mathews Memorial Library sponsored by the Middle Peninsula League of Voters.

The incumbents for the three supervisor positions—Charles Ingram, Janine Burns, and Edwina Casey—made statements suggesting they are running on their record of accomplishments and their responsible management of the budget during a tough economy, while the three Republican contenders—Haskins Ramos, Ruth Litschewski and Patrick Beattie—indicated that they believe in limited government and said they would bring fiscal accountability and transparency to the board.

Ingram was absent from last Thursday’s forum, and Casey missed Monday’s meeting.

The incumbents stood behind their recent adoption of the updated comprehensive plan and cited the many public meetings they held while developing it over a four- to six-year period, but the contenders said they were prompted to run for office partly because of reservations about the document.

Litschewski and Beattie admitted they hadn’t attended any of the meetings on the comprehensive plan, while Ramos said he had attended one. However, all three expressed concern that the plan had been influenced by forces from outside of Mathews County and said the document reduces the individual’s control over his or her land.