Middle school plans still being developed in Gloucester

by Kim Robins - Posted on May 04, 2011 - 05:24 PM

Photo: Gloucester School Board members got their first look last Wednesday at the interior of Page Middle School, where restoration workers have made tremendous strides in protecting school property and returning personal belongings. Above from left, board members Ann Burruss and Jay McGlohn consulted with school division construction manager Scott Shorland before the board met to devise a plan for housing middle-schoolers for the 2011-2012 school year. Photo by Kim Robins.

Gloucester School Board members got their first look last Wednesday at the interior of Page Middle School, where restoration workers have made tremendous strides in protecting school property and returning personal belongings. Above from left, board members Ann Burruss and Jay McGlohn consulted with school division construction manager Scott Shorland before the board met to devise a plan for housing middle-schoolers for the 2011-2012 school year. Photo by Kim Robins.

Officials with Gloucester County Public Schools are still developing plans to provide education services in the 2011-2012 school year for the 580 students displaced from Page Middle School when that facility was 40 percent demolished by a tornado on April 16. In the meantime, damage assessment efforts are ongoing at the Page site.

Page students are currently sharing Peasley Middle School with Peasley’s 720 students. The Peasley students attend school on the campus in the morning and the Page students in the afternoon until 6:30 p.m. The split schedule plan returned the displaced middle school students to their studies just three days after the tornado struck, but has created a hardship for some parents.

Last week, Gloucester School Board members approved Superintendent Ben Kiser’s plan to move all of the Page and Peasley eighth graders to the Gloucester High School campus for the upcoming school year. All six and seventh graders will remain at Peasley and resume a schedule that is closer to their former regular school day.

The approximately 450 eighth graders will attend classes in a pair of modular buildings, one to be placed on the paved GHS driver’s education course and the other on what is now the faculty parking lot. Kiser said one building will hold 14 classrooms and the other will contain 10 classrooms along with an administrative area, a clinic and a guidance office.