Gloucester’s Rosenwald schools honored

by Sherry Hamilton - Posted on Feb 26, 2014 - 02:05 PM

Photo: Kay Coles James, founder and president of The Gloucester Institute, welcomes guests to a Legacy Tea held at Holly Knoll on Sunday to honor Gloucester residents who attended Rosenwald schools. Standing in back is Warren Deal of the T.C. Walker and Woodville/Rosenwald School Foundation, who also spoke at the event. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Kay Coles James, founder and president of The Gloucester Institute, welcomes guests to a Legacy Tea held at Holly Knoll on Sunday to honor Gloucester residents who attended Rosenwald schools. Standing in back is Warren Deal of the T.C. Walker and Woodville/Rosenwald School Foundation, who also spoke at the event. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Photo: Among those honored at Sunday’s Legacy Tea were, from left, Joyce Braxton, Christine Boyd and Betty Jennings, all of whom attended Bena-Hayes School. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Among those honored at Sunday’s Legacy Tea were, from left, Joyce Braxton, Christine Boyd and Betty Jennings, all of whom attended Bena-Hayes School. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

Former students of Rosenwald schools in Gloucester County were honored at a Legacy Tea at Holly Knoll in Cappahosic on Sunday.

Dozens attended the event, which was sponsored by the T.C. Walker and Woodville/Rosenwald School Foundation with support from the Gloucester Institute.

Kay Coles James, president and founder of the Gloucester Institute, welcomed guests in the newly-completed conference room at the Moton Center, where Holly Knoll is located. Boy Scout Troop 113 presented the colors.

Warren Deal of the T.C. Walker and Woodville/Rosenwald School Foundation explained that the effort to establish Rosenwald schools in Gloucester was led by T.C. Walker and supported by the parents and families of many of those in attendance.

“This is a long overdue reunion and celebration of what your families did and of what you have done in your lives,” Deal said.

Rosenwald schools were built in the South during the 1920s partly from contributions made by Julius Rosenwald, then chairman of Sears Roebuck and Company.

Deal said that the objectives of the foundation are to recognize the efforts that were made at the turn of the 20th century to establish a quality educational system for the African American community and to preserve and restore Woodville School at Ordinary, which was built in 1923.