‘Legacy Tea’ to recognize Rosenwald schools

by Bill Nachman - Posted on Feb 05, 2014 - 02:30 PM
Photo: A “Legacy Tea” will be held on Sunday, Feb. 23 at the Gloucester Institute, Cappahosic, to recognize the contributions of African Americans who were educated at Rosenwald schools in Gloucester from the 1920s to early 1950s. The lone Rosenwald School building still standing in Gloucester is Woodville School, above, which is located on Route 17, Ordinary. A foundation is trying to raise funds to restore and reopen that building for various uses. Photo by Bill Nachman

A “Legacy Tea” will be held on Sunday, Feb. 23 at the Gloucester Institute, Cappahosic, to recognize the contributions of African Americans who were educated at Rosenwald schools in Gloucester from the 1920s to early 1950s. The lone Rosenwald School building still standing in Gloucester is Woodville School, above, which is located on Route 17, Ordinary. A foundation is trying to raise funds to restore and reopen that building for various uses. Photo by Bill Nachman

A “Legacy Tea” to recognize the importance of Rosenwald schools that were built in Gloucester, and the African American students who were educated in them from the 1920s to early 1950s, will be held from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23, at the Gloucester Institute, Cappahosic.
 
The theme for the tea is “A Commemoration and Celebration of the African American Educational Experience.” The program will be held in honor of students of Bena-Hayes (located at Hayes), Bethel (Sassafras), Gloucester Training School (Roanes), James Store (James Store), Purton (Signpine) and Woodville (Ordinary) schools. Dorothy C. Cooke, a member of sponsor T.C. Walker-Woodville-Rosenwald Foundation, said that Woodville School is the lone school still standing.
 
The tea will help spotlight the kickoff for the foundation’s fundraising efforts, Cooke said. Over an unspecified period, she said, the foundation hopes to renovate the Woodville School, located on Route 17 near 17 Plaza Shopping Center.
 
The Feb. 23 program will include foundation president Warren Deal explaining the group’s mission, Cooke said, as well as a flag ceremony with Boy Scout Troop 113 and music by the fifth grade chorus at Bethel Elementary School. Tea, light food and desserts will be served.
 
“We want the young people to interact with the older people to learn about what it was like attending a Rosenwald school,” Cooke said. Cooke herself attended the Bethel School at Sassafras for grades 1-5 back when there were separate community schools for blacks and whites.