A transformative gift:  Samarkand donated to Mathews Community Foundation

by Sherry Hamilton - Posted on Dec 31, 2013 - 12:44 PM
Photo: Samarkand, an estate in Mathews County formerly owned by Tony and Judy Hannold of Richmond, has been donated to the Mathews Community Foundation. Proceeds from its sale will be used to benefit the residents of Mathews in various charitable ways. Photo courtesy of Long and Foster Real Estate

Samarkand, an estate in Mathews County formerly owned by Tony and Judy Hannold of Richmond, has been donated to the Mathews Community Foundation. Proceeds from its sale will be used to benefit the residents of Mathews in various charitable ways. Photo courtesy of Long and Foster Real Estate

Photo: Tony and Judy Hannold said they love to think that money from the sale of Samarkand will stay in the community “and be used for our friends and neighbors.” Photo courtesy of Mathews Community Foundation

Tony and Judy Hannold said they love to think that money from the sale of Samarkand will stay in the community “and be used for our friends and neighbors.” Photo courtesy of Mathews Community Foundation

A former Mathews couple has given the county a gift that should serve county residents for years to come.
 
Tony and Judy Hannold of Richmond donated their former estate, Samarkand, to the Mathews Community Foundation. Proceeds from its sale will be divided between the foundation’s unrestricted endowment and its Tony & Judy Hannold Fund to Alleviate Poverty, with the unrestricted fund receiving 90 percent of the money.
 
Foundation chair George Groseclose said the donation is “a spectacular gift,” and former chair Bob Roper called it “transformative.”
 
“It’s going to mean a lot to the community and to the community foundation,” said Roper.
 
The circa 1927 five-bedroom Colonial Revival home sits on 14 landscaped acres on Woodas Creek. The property is listed by Long & Foster Real Estate for $1.3 million.
 
Judy Hannold described Samarkand as a “wonderfully light, open house with wonderful architectural detail.” She said she and her husband, a retired short line railroad owner and CEO, had always enjoyed landscaping and maintaining the grounds themselves, but as they began to age, it became increasingly difficult to handle the work. They eventually decided a retirement community was the answer, and they moved in late October.