Chesapeake Bay deadrise finds new life as floating museum

by Quinton Sheppard - Posted on Aug 07, 2013 - 01:20 PM

Photo: Volunteers spent countless hours working on the Peggy, attempting to get her back to her original glory. Shown installing her new pilothouse last week, from left, are volunteers Capt. Dean Close, Preston Jenkins, Dave Mortimer, George Pongonis, Scott Brooks and Capt. Kerry Hall. Photo courtesy of Dave Machen

Volunteers spent countless hours working on the Peggy, attempting to get her back to her original glory. Shown installing her new pilothouse last week, from left, are volunteers Capt. Dean Close, Preston Jenkins, Dave Mortimer, George Pongonis, Scott Brooks and Capt. Kerry Hall. Photo courtesy of Dave Machen

After years of work and thousands of hours of volunteer labor, the Peggy, Mathews County’s signature deadrise workboat, is almost ready to begin her second chance in life.

Later next month, the boat with such a special significance to Tidewater’s maritime history, will be honored with a reception as a formal re-introduction to the public.

"We’re to the point that what we do from here on is what you will be able to see with your eyes," said Mathews Maritime Foundation member George Pongonis, who has been overseeing the Peggy’s restoration efforts. Up to this point, most of the work has been focusing on the intricate details not ordinarily seen by the naked eye.

Peggy entered the pound net trade in 1925 for Walter Burroughs, who named her for his daughter. She later went on to become a crab dredger for many years under the ownership of Edward Grinnell.

She was donated to the MMF by her last owners, Kim and Gretchen Granberry, in hopes that she would be an ambassador to help others remember the maritime history of which she was such a big part.