Moton Center complex undergoing renovations

by Sherry Hamilton - Posted on Jul 17, 2013 - 01:01 PM

Photo: The Moton Center at Cappahosic, which is owned by the Gloucester Institute, is being renovated for use as an educational and conference center. The buildings shown here will provide dormitory and meeting space. Here, the institute’s director of programs C.J. Sailor, right, greets Marion Randall, president of  the Gloucester Retired Educators Association, who was at the center for a meeting of the organization. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

The Moton Center at Cappahosic, which is owned by the Gloucester Institute, is being renovated for use as an educational and conference center. The buildings shown here will provide dormitory and meeting space. Here, the institute’s director of programs C.J. Sailor, right, greets Marion Randall, president of the Gloucester Retired Educators Association, who was at the center for a meeting of the organization. Photo by Sherry Hamilton

The Moton Center in Cappahosic is bustling with activity these days.

Workmen are renovating the two-story conference building, removing and replacing concrete around the swimming pool, and anticipating renovations to a two-story dormitory building.

Rooms in a single-story building have already been upgraded to serve as living quarters for a facility manager and a motel for other key personnel, and they are temporarily being used as dorm rooms for students participating in the Emerging Leaders program. The program helps minority students with professional development by fostering speaking, writing, and critical thinking skills.

Clarence "C.J." Sailor, director of programs for the Gloucester Institute, which owns and operates the facility, said future renovations, funds permitting, will include upgrading a small cottage for use as a guest house for writers and turning a sixth building into a laundry and storage facility.

The renovated conference center is the vision of the Gloucester Institute’s founder, Kay Coles James, said Sailor. Under her guidance, the center will eventually be a fully operating leadership institute for minority leaders from across the nation.

"What better place than Gloucester County, which Robert Russa Moton chose," said Sailor. "It’s best to continue his legacy right on the grounds he chose."